PVC Roofing

Do You Have A Commercial Roofing Project We Can Help With?

What is PVC Roofing?

Thermoplastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl) membrane roofing, is a high performing, low slope roofing solution. PVC membranes’ natural strength, waterproofing ability and fire resistance make them an affordable and sustainable cool roofing material. Vinyl’s extended life cycle – and the associated low energy consumption to produce the raw material and process it into vinyl roofing – is a significant factor in its usability as a building product.

Reflective vinyl roofs have protected and kept buildings comfortable in harsh climates around the world for decades, and are one solution to curbing high peak demand electrical charges.

What is PVC Roofing?

Thermoplastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC or vinyl) membrane roofing, is a high performing, low slope roofing solution. PVC membranes’ natural strength, waterproofing ability and fire resistance make them an affordable and sustainable cool roofing material. Vinyl’s extended life cycle – and the associated low energy consumption to produce the raw material and process it into vinyl roofing – is a significant factor in its usability as a building product.

Reflective vinyl roofs have protected and kept buildings comfortable in harsh climates around the world for decades, and are one solution to curbing high peak demand electrical charges.

Benefits of PVC Roofing

Durability

PVC roofing membranes can stand up to some of the toughest stresses and have been proven to support and protect roofs throughout the world.

  • The vinyl polymer’s construction creates an inherent resistance not found in other materials without additives.
  • Vinyl roofing membranes have been employed successfully in waterproofing applications for over 30 years.
  • The heat-welded seams of thermoplastic vinyl make a permanent, watertight bond that is stronger than the roofing membrane itself. This is an advantage over roofing systems that rely on adhesives, tapes, and caulks to permanently seal the seams.
  • Properly designed and installed vinyl roofing systems are durable and can meet or exceed the wind uplift requirements needed to obtain FM approvals — many in-service membranes have survived the onslaught of Category 3 hurricanes, and can be designed specifically for storm-prone climates.

Aesthetics

PVC roofing membranes’ aesthetic qualities make them the choice for any roof design.

  • Vinyl membranes are typically available in cool colors of white, beige, or gray. However, adding pigments to vinyl resin during formulation can create membranes in a wide spectrum of hues for aseptically pleasing offerings.
  • Complex roof lines and curvatures or multiple roof penetrations can all be incorporated by vinyl’s inherent flexibility and strength.
  • Some current green roofs have lasted more than 40 years without being replaced, adding aesthetic, ecological and social benefits to modern buildings in urban areas.
  • Vinyl roofing is frequently used in the waterproofing layer of these green roofs; as the permanent hot-air welded seams do not degrade in the perpetually moist environment of a green roof, and it is highly reflective at halting water and root penetration.

Sustainability

Roofs made of PVC roofing membrane contribute significantly to achieving two major objectives of green building programs – the reduction of both building cooling loads and the urban heat island effect.

  • A white vinyl roof can reflect 80 percent or more of the sun’s rays and emit at least 70 percent of the solar radiation that the absorbed by the building, making it a highly sustainable roofing option.
  • In full sun, the surface of a black low-slope roof may experience a temperature increase of as much as 50 to 90 degrees, easily reaching temperatures of 150 to 190 degrees in summer. A white vinyl roof on the same building increases only 10 to 25 degrees above ambient temperatures, lowering surrounding air temperature and reducing smog formation.
  • Vinyl roofing membranes have a long service life. Many vinyl roof systems have been in service in excess of 25 years.
  • When compared to other roofing materials, less energy is needed to produce the raw material and process it into the end product. Most alternatives use far more energy during creation.
  • 57 percent of vinyl resin is derived from salt. Less oil is used to produce vinyl than in the production of base materials for any other single-ply roofing membrane.